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Aaron Douglas, Song of the Towers (detail)

The Creative Process

James Baldwin

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  • Paapa hMensa

    Beautiful. As a songwriter and music artist, I resonate a lot with this. A lot of my philosophy on art, or rather the art that I choose to share with others, has been influenced by C.S. Lewis, Francis Schaeffer, and Henri Nouwen so far. And I believe they would all agree with Baldwin's sentiments but also extend it. That the Christian artist must war with society as well as his own self, ultimately communicating humanity's limits, and God's majesty.

  • Gina A. Oliva

    I love this. Maybe because I fancy myself an artist. But really, are ALL artist..made in the image of the Great Artist. So........I think we all have a responsibility to be our Artist Self. Profound :-)

  • Rev. D.M.Kennedy

    Wonderful and most engrossing - very worthy of reading and concentration!!!

Perhaps the primary distinction of the artist is that he must actively cultivate that state which most men, necessarily, must avoid: the state of being alone. That all men are, when the chips are down, alone, is a banality – a banality because it is very frequently stated, but very rarely, on the evidence, believed. Most of us are not compelled to linger with the knowledge of our aloneness, for it is a knowledge that can paralyze all action in this world. There are, forever, swamps to be drained, cities to be created, mines to be exploited, children to be fed. None of these things can be done alone. But the conquest of the physical world is not man’s only duty. He is also enjoined to conquer the great wilderness of himself. The precise role of the artist, then, is to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through that vast forest, so that we will not, in all our doing, lose sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place.

The state of being alone is not meant to bring to mind merely a rustic musing beside some silver lake. The aloneness of which I speak is much more like the aloneness of birth or death. It is like the fearless alone that one sees in the eyes of someone who is suffering, whom we cannot help. Or it is like the aloneness of love, the force and mystery that so many have extolled and so many have cursed, but which no one has ever understood or ever really been able to control. I put the matter this way, not out of any desire to create pity for the artist – God forbid! – but to suggest how nearly, after all, is his state the state of everyone, and in an attempt to make vivid his endeavor. The state of birth, suffering, love, and death are extreme states – extreme, universal, and inescapable. We all know this, but we would rather not know it. The artist is present to correct the delusions to which we fall prey in our attempts to avoid this knowledge…

I seem to be making extremely grandilo­quent claims for a breed of men and women historically despised while living and acclaimed when safely dead. But, in a way, the belated honor that all societies tender their artists proves the reality of the point I am trying to make. I am really trying to make clear the nature of the artist’s responsibility to his society. The peculiar nature of this responsibility is that he must never cease warring with it, for its sake and for his own. Societies never know it, but the war of an artist with his society is a lover’s war, and he does, at his best, what lovers do, which is to reveal the beloved to himself and, with that revelation, to make freedom real.


Source: James Baldwin: Collected Essays (Library of America, 1998). Used by arrangement with the James Baldwin Estate. © Estate of James Baldwin.

Aaron Douglas, Song of the Towers (detail)

Aaron Douglas, Song of the Towers
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Image from Wikimedia Commons (public domain)

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James Baldwin (1924–1987) was an American novelist and public intellectual.

3 Comments