Easter Readings

Pink and red tulips in a cup

Across all cultures, men and women have found consolation and courage in the belief that death is not the end, but that it is followed by another, better life to come. How this next life will come about and what form it will take are questions that have occupied the human race down the centuries.

We hope this collection of thoughts, meditations and short stories will lead the reader closer to the Biblical Christ, and his continuing resurrection...

Books: Easter Readings

The Selfish Giant English

The Selfish Giant

By Oscar Wilde

Every afternoon, as they were coming from school, the children used to go and play in the Giant's garden. One day the Giant came back... Deutsch

The Bell of Sundown Hollow

The Bell of Sundown Hollow

By Kirk Wareham

A timeless short story suitable for family reading. Depression and poverty have overtaken the residents of Sundown Hollow, until a boy's faith and perseverance lifts their hearts toward Easter.

The Innocent - a short story for Easter

The Innocent

By Jane Tyson Clement

Who can comfort a mother who lost her only son? A short story.

Articles: Easter Readings

painting of hands holding a red heart on a gold background

The Legend of Heliopher

By Hardy Arnold

Heliopher spoke to his people: O believe not, ye wise men, that ye can be victorious over darkness by being more dark; only love is stronger. Deutsch Español

Saint Peter’s rescue from the Lake Galilee

Why Did Jesus Choose Peter?

By Barney Boller

Why did Jesus choose Peter as the rock of the church? Despite Peter’s betrayal and doubt, isn’t his example of clinging to Jesus the true foundation of the church?

sudanese woman cooking

What Difference Does Easter Make?

By Sr. Marilyn Lacey

Does the resurrection actually change anything in our lives and our world? The writer finds an answer among displaced women and girls in Haiti and South Sudan.

JTissot_fishers2

There Was Always Water

By Ian Barth

There was a thirst that grew in the sweat-stained comradeship among us, the sense that the way things were was not the way they should be.