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A Syrian refugee girl.

Poem: Aleppo

A. V. Levine

  • Barbara Panowitz

    ...and God Weeps...

  • metin erdem

    I can not sleep in peace in the nights while my brothers and sisters in Syria suffers. We need to do something for them especially for migrants. . If we can not to anything we can at least pray God for peace for them. Especially the children and women have hard time. They are innocent people . Lets think a child . While he or she plays, a bomb comes to the land. The child is bleeding and can not understand what is happening around him. Because they dont have anything but the God. We need to hug them when they come to your door. They are our brothers and sisters. They are also created by God. So we need to love them and share the love and peace of God with migrants of the Syria. There are about 3 million migrants in Turkey and we try to reach them and share our food and love with them. This is what God wants us to do.

When US Army veteran A. V. Levine saw a recent photo of a five-year-old Syrian girl from Aleppo, her clothing torn by the effects of a barrel bomb, her stare blank with shock, it broke his heart. He wrote this poem in response.


1. This child born to grief
May live a while…

Even as war grinds
Neighborhoods to dust

Safe for a moment
In outlawed time—

Impossible to measure
Her chances

As the siege worsens and death
Daily barrels down

2. Born to grief this child
may outlive her sibs…

Or they may live
A while longer…

Even as the family in a snap
May be torn to rags

Or at moment’s end
endure obliteration

3. This child born to grief
May yet live a while longer…

While bomb-fall
And hunger kill equally

The heart and body
Of Aleppo.




Photograph: Russell Watkins/Department for International Development (public domain).

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Contributed By A. V. Levine

Born in England, where he lived through WWII, A. V. Levine served in the US Army during the Korean War. He studied at Columbia University and Claremont Graduate University, and later taught history at New England College and the Universities of Maryland and Maine.