Plough Logo

Shopping Cart

  View Cart

Subtotal:

Checkout
book shelf stuffed with books

Editors’ Picks Issue 4

0 Comments

Next Article:

painting of the Madonna and Child

Meeting Mary

Since the Reformation, Westerners’ attitudes to Mary have too often been polarized: she is attacked or defended as a sign of division between Catholics and Protestants. ­Picturing Mary helps us recover the real Mary.

Continue Reading

Explore Other Articles:

0 Comments
0 Comments
    Submit

Richard John Neuhaus: A Life in the Public Square

By Randy Boyagoda (Image) This substantive new ­biography mines the mind of Neuhaus (1936–2009), one of the leading public intellectuals of the last half-­century. From prominent antiwar cleric to outspoken conservative Catholic, the arc of Neuhaus’s life might seem one of contradiction, but this volume, drawing heavily on his personal correspondence, reveals an authentic spiritual and intellectual striving to remain true to an ardent faith in Christ, as well as an uncommon capacity for friendship. Neuhaus’s genius was to boldly engage people of every persuasion on many of the most pressing issues of his day. Evangelicals and Catholics Together and First Things magazine are two ongoing expressions of his legacy. more

 

book cover  View book details

Deep Down Dark: The Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free

by Héctor Tobar (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) Based on exclusive interviews with the survivors of the 2010 Chilean mining disaster, this riveting account is a memorable exploration of human nature – and the uncanny power of brotherly affection. Trapped as much by their fear of dying as by two thousand vertical feet of rock, the miners endured hunger, thirst, and near-despair before an enormous drill bit reached them. But it’s unlikely they could have emerged intact had it not been for their faith in the power of prayer and their willingness to put aside differences for the sake of the common good. Tobar, a Pulitzer Prize–winning journalist, takes us not only down into the stifling underworld the miners inhabit, but also into the heart of a remarkable ad hoc community which saved its members just as surely as the capsule that hauled them to the surface after their ten-week nightmare underground. more

 

book cover  View book details

Black River: A Novel

by S. M. Hulse (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) When Wes Carver, a Montana correctional officer, was maimed by a prisoner during a riot twenty years ago, he lost his greatest gift: an uncommon ability to play the fiddle. Now the man is up for parole, and Wes has been asked to testify at the hearing. While billed as a story of forgiveness, faith, and family, it’s more accurately about the inability to forgive, the elusiveness of faith, and the long odds of restoring wounded psyches and ­tattered relationships. This is one debut novel that lives up to the acclaim: the characters are convincing, the details are authentic, and the storyline is captivating to the very last page. more

 

 

book cover  View book details

Change of Heart: Justice, Mercy, and Making Peace with My Sister’s Killer

by Jeanne Bishop (Westminster John Knox) Here is an anthology of the environmental writings of authors ranging from Henry David Thoreau to Rebecca Solnit. Included in this volume are prominent authors and activists from the 1800s to the present. The writings of historical giants such as John Muir and Rachel Carson share space with more contemporary voices such as Wendell Berry and Paul Hawken, compiled by Bill McKibben into what is possibly the most comprehensive synthesis of environmental literature of the century. more

 

 

 

 

 

book cover  View book details

 

0 Comments